6th Annual Car Show & Street Festival

 

It was hot on Passyunk today, yeah the sun had the pavement soft, but it was the hot rods, trucks and motorcycles that lined the Avenue that added a few extra degrees, but in a good way.   I’m still a sucker for 60′s and 70′s muscle cars.   There was also crafts, food and music.

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Manufacturing the American Soldier

The year was 2001, almost exactly 10 years ago, and I was living in New York City with my four year old son.  The date was September 11th, and extremist Osama Bin Ladin launched an attack which changed America forever.  I won’t go into the details of that day, except to say that we lived close enough to the tragic site that despite my efforts to seal my apartment windows, the smell which my son described as “donuts…the kind with sprinkles on them” permeated our home for weeks.

I didn’t take my young son outside for 2 days.  Rumors around Manhattan swirled about that smell, and the possibility that it was chemical warfare.  When we did venture outside, I saw a world very different than the one I had left.  Even Sam, just barely at the age when one starts to realize there is a world beyond themselves, saw it instantly.  Our safe little neighborhood was plastered with “Missing” posters, filled with photos of the smiling faces of our neighbors, people from our building, the parents of Sam’s friends.  It was as if we went to bed in one America, and woke up on another planet.

And then I saw it.  Something simple, yet it stopped me in my tracks, and took my breath away.  A crudely written sign, printed in a rushed, childlike scrawl, on a rough piece of cardboard, and left on the dashboard of a white van, clearly enough to be seen by those walking by.  “God Bless America”, it said.  I felt like I had been punched in the gut.  This was suddenly bigger than two buildings.  This was bigger than the deaths of countless innocent New Yorkers.  This was global, and I was petrified.

American flags popped up everywhere.  People walked down the street carrying them.  They were draped from windows, tacked to walls, sold on every street corner.  Until that time, I’m not sure Sam had ever seen an American Flag.  It was now the image he couldn’t cross the street without being assaulted by.

Before we left the apartment that day, I had held on to the illusion that I would be able to shield my toddler from the events.  But it wasn’t possible.  At kindergarten, my child’s class was taken into the boiler room of their school and told that this was where they would go in the case “that there was another attack”.  On a visit to the pediatric dentist, Sam reached into the fairy house for his plastic prize, as CNN’s Aaron Brown’s voice filled the room with the details no child should hear and filled the parents with dread and the realization that there would be no shielding our children.  Not this time.

I remember taking Sam to a movie, for a break from reality.  It was Shrek, I believe, but it doesn’t really matter.  All that my son remembered from that day was the extended commercial before the movie.  Filling the screen in Dolby Surround sound, a recreation played out of the thrilling life that awaited the children in the theater.  “Be All You Can Be”, in The Army.  The combat marketing had begun.  America was grooming its youth, for the impending war.  The one they claimed was launched to find Osama Bin Laden.  And they wanted our kids.

And then there were the GI Joes.  After Sept. 11, action figures saw sales of $1.26 billion in 2002, up 21 percent over 2001, and have made up the fastest growing segment in the toy industry. While traditional toys like Barbie have seen sales falling 12 percent in 2001 and another 2 percent in 2002, G.I. Joe stormed his way through a 46 percent sales increase that year, and then a four year run of double digit growth.  My floors were littered with every figure, weapon and footlocker made.  He and his friends were obsessed.

During Sam’s elementary school years, the popularity of video games, PC games and online gaming spread like wildfire.  With games like Call of Duty, Medal of Honor and Counterstrike my son’s formal war education began.  Opening scenes, taught him the skills that soldiers of previous wars never could have imagined.  Our children learned to see things through a sniper’s scope, how to accurately lob a grenade, how to crawl on their bellies under razor wire.  Before he left elementary school, my Sam knew more about wars, weaponry and strategically planning assaults than I ever imagined possible.

Ten years have passed.  Sam is 13 years old now.  Osama Bin Laden was killed by American forces, and yet the Afghanistan war rages on.  It is currently the longest American war in history, and in a few short years my son and his friends will be old enough to go.   I have spent many years trying to de-program Sam.  I think I’ve been successful.  But there are other mothers who haven’t been.  Or possibly they have fallen victim to the pretense of having to sacrifice their family to protect their country.

I now call Philly my home.  And this Memorial day, I can’t let pass without thinking of all those boys, who grew up seeing those flags and playing those video games, and who were experts on guns before ever picking one up.  I will think about 19 year old  Pfc. John F. Kihm from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania who died on April 19, 2011.  He would have been 10 years old when all of those flags started flying and his basic training began.  It must have all seemed terribly exciting to him.  I didn’t know John, but I’ll be thinking about him on Monday.

And so, this Memorial day, here are more of our fallen Pennsylvania soldiers.  They are our children, our fathers, our friends, our family, and our neighbors.  A war still rages on, and a country is filled with our American heroes.   Let’s remember them, and hope they come home soon.

 

May 10, 2011

1st Lt. Demetrius M. Frison, 26 – Lancaster, Pennsylvania – Company A, 1st Battalion, 26th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 1st Infantry Division. Died of wounds suffered when insurgents attacked his unit using a roadside bomb in Khost province, Afghanistan, on May 10, 2011.

April 19, 2011

-Pfc. John F. Kihm, 19 – Philadelphia, Pennsylvania – 1st Battalion, 32nd Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 10th Mountain Division. Died as a result of a non-battle related injury in Kandahar province, Afghanistan, on April 19, 2011.

April 23, 2011

-Sgt. 1st Class Benjamin Franklin Bitner, 37 – Greencastle, Pennsylvania – Company C, 2nd Battalion, 3rd Special Forces Group. Died of wounds suffered when insurgents attacked his unit using a roadside bomb while on patrol in Kandahar province, Afghanistan, on April 23, 2011.

February 21, 2011

-Sgt. Robert Curtis Sisson Jr., 29 – Aliquippa, Pennsylvania – Company A, 1st Battalion, 22nd Infantry Regiment, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division . Died in a non-combat related incident in Saryah Kalach, Kandahar province, Afghanistan, on February 21, 2011.

-Cpl.Jarrid L. King, 20 – Erie, Pennsylvania – 693rd Engineer Company, 7th Engineer Battalion, 10th Sustainment Brigade, 10th Mountain Division. One of three soldiers killed when enemy forces attacked their unit with a roadside bomb in Ghazni province, Afghanistan, on January 12, 2011.

December 18, 2010

-Cpl. Eric M. Torbert Jr., 25 – Lancaster, Pennsylvania – 1st Combat Engineer Battalion, 1st Marine Division, I Marine Expeditionary Force Died after a roadside bomb attack in Helmand province, Afghanistan, on December 18, 2010.

December 15, 2010

Staff Sgt. Justin E. Schmalstieg,28 – Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania – 1st Explosive Ordnance Disposal Company, 7th Engineer Support Battalion, 1st Marine Logistics Group, I Marine Expeditionary Force Died while conducting combat operations in Helmand province, Afghanistan, on December 15, 2010.

November 22, 2010

-Staff Sgt. Sean Michael Flannery, 29 – Wyomissing, Pennsylvania – Company A, 2nd Battalion, 502nd Infantry Regiment, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division. One of two soldiers killed when insurgents attacked their unit with a roadside bomb in the village of Ghotamudkha, Zhari district, Kandahar province, Afghanistan, on November 22, 2010.

November 8, 2010

-Spc.Anthony Vargas, 27 – Reading, Pennsylvania – C Troop, 1st Squadron, 61st Cavalry Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division. Died of wounds suffered when insurgents attacked his unit using a roadside bomb during a patrol in the Khogyani district of Nangarhar province, Afghanistan, on November 8, 2010.

November 7, 2010

-Spc. Dale Justin Kridlo, 33 – Hughestown, Pennsylvania – 161st Engineer Company, 27th Engineer Battalion, 20th Engineer Brigade. One of two soldiers killed when insurgents attacked their unit with small-arms fire in Kunar province, Afghanistan, on November 7, 2010.

October 10, 2010

-Staff Sgt. David Jee Weigle, 29 – Philadelphia, Pennsylvania – Headquarters and Headquarters Troop, 1st Squadron, 75th Cavalry Regiment, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division. One of two soldiers killed when their vehicle was struck by a roadside bomb in the Zhari district of Kandahar province, Afghanistan, on October 10, 2010.

September 28, 2010

-Lance Cpl.Ralph J. Fabbri, 20 – Gallitzin, Pennsylvania – Headquarters Battalion, 1st Marine Division, I Marine Expeditionary Force. Died while conducting combat operations in Helmand province, Afghanistan, on September 28, 2010.

September 18, 2010

-Spc. Joshua A. Harton, 23 – Bethlehem, Pennsylvania – 3rd Battalion, 6th Field Artillery Regiment, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 10th Mountain Division. Died of wounds suffered when insurgents attacked his unit using small arms and rocket-propelled grenade fire in Kaftar Khan, Afghanistan, on September 18, 2010.

September 2, 2010

-Lance Cpl. Joshua T. Twigg, 21 – Indiana, Pennsylvania – 2nd Battalion, 9th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, II Marine Expeditionary Force. Died while conducting combat operations in Helmand province, Afghanistan, on September 2, 2010.

July 27, 2010

-Lance Cpl.Abram L. Howard, 21 – Williamsport, Pennsylvania – USA Headquarters and Service Battalion, 4th Marine Logistics Group, Marine Forces Reserve Died following an insurgent attack in Helmand province, Afghanistan, on July 27, 2010.

-Spc. Jesse D. Reed, 26 – Orefield, Pennsylvania – 27th Engineer Battalion, 20th Engineer Brigade One of four soldiers killed when insurgents attacked their military vehicle with a roadside bomb in Zabul province, Afghanistan, on July 14, 2010.

July 5, 2010

-Spc. Louis R. Fastuca, 24 – West Chester, Pennsylvania – 1st Battalion, 503rd Infantry Regiment, 173rd Airborne Brigade Combat Team Died of wounds suffered when insurgents attacked his vehicle with a roadside bomb at Abdulhamid Kalay in Ghazni province, Afghanistan, on July 5, 2010.

July 2, 2010

-Pfc. David A. Jefferson, 23 – Philadelphia, Pennsylvania – Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 502nd Infantry Regiment, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division Died of injuries sustained when a roadside bomb detonated near his dismounted patrol in Kandahar, Afghanistan, on July 2, 2010.

June 26, 2010

-Sgt.Joseph D. Caskey, 24 – Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania – 3rd Battalion, 1st Marine Regiment, 1st Marine Division, I Marine Expeditionary Force Died following a roadside bomb attack in Helmand province, Afghanistan, on June 26, 2010.

June 11, 2010

-Sgt. 1st ClassRobert J. Fike, 38 – Conneautville, Pennsylvania – 1st Battalion, 110th Infantry Regiment, Pennsylvania Army National Guard One of two soldiers killed when a suicide bomber detonated an explosive device during a patrol near Forward Operating Base Bullard in Zabul province, Afghanistan, on June 11, 2010.

-Staff Sgt.Bryan A. Hoover, 29 – West Elizabeth, Pennsylvania -1st Battalion, 110th Infantry Regiment, Pennsylvania Army National Guard One of two soldiers killed when a suicide bomber detonated an explosive device during a patrol near Forward Operating Base Bullard in Zabul province, Afghanistan, on June 11, 2010.

-Staff Sgt.Bryan A. Hoover, 29 – West Elizabeth, Pennsylvania -1st Battalion, 110th Infantry Regiment, Pennsylvania Army National Guard One of two soldiers killed when a suicide bomber detonated an explosive device during a patrol near Forward Operating Base Bullard in Zabul province, Afghanistan, on June 11, 2010.

June 8, 2010

-Sgt.Derek L. Shanfield, 22 – Hastings, Pennsylvania – 2nd Battalion, 6th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, II Marine Expeditionary Force One of two Marines killed when a roadside bomb detonated during combat operations in Helmand province, Afghanistan, on June 8, 2010.

May 3, 2010

-Airman 1st Class Austin H. Gates-Benson, 19 – Hellertown, Pennsylvania – 54th Combat Communications Squadron, 5th Combat Communications Group, 689th Combat Communications Wing. Died of injuries sustained from a non-combat related incident near Khyber, Afghanistan, on May 3, 2010.

April 27, 2010

-Sgt. Nathan P. Kennedy, 24 – Claysville, Pennsylvania – 2nd Battalion, 12th Infantry Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division. Died of wounds sustained when enemy forces attacked his unit using small arms fire near Quarando Village, Afghanistan, on April 27, 2010.

February 18, 2010

-Lance Cpl. Larry M. Johnson, 19 – Scranton, Pennsylvania – 2nd Combat Engineer Battalion, 2nd Marine Division, II Marine Expeditionary Force. Died while supporting combat operations in Helmand province, Afghanistan, on February 18, 2010.

February 1, 2010

Lance Cpl. Michael L. Freeman Jr., 21 – Fayetteville, Pennsylvania – 2nd Battalion, 2nd Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, II Marine Expeditionary Force. Died while supporting combat operations in Helmand province, Afghanistan, on February 1, 2010.

January 17, 2010

-Sgt. 1st Class Michael P. Shannon, 52 – Canadensis, Pennsylvania – Headquarters, 7th Army and U.S. Army Europe. Died of injuries sustained from a non-combat related incident in Kabul, Afghanistan, on January 17, 2010.

January 11, 2010

-Staff Sgt. Matthew N. Ingham, 25 – Altoona, Pennsylvania – 3rd Reconnaissance Battalion, 3rd Marine Division, III Marine Expeditionary Force. One of three Marines killed while supporting combat operations in Helmand province, Afghanistan, on January 11, 2009.

December 20, 2009

-Pfc. Serge Kropov, 21 – Hawley, Pennsylvania – Marine Aircraft Group 16, 3rd Marine Aircraft Wing, I Marine Expeditionary Force. Died as a result of a non-hostile incident in Helmand province, Afghanistan, on December 20, 2009.

October 15, 2009

-Staff Sgt. Glen H. Stivison Jr., 34 – Blairsville, Pennsylvania – 569th Mobility Augmentation Company, 4th Engineer Battalion. One of four soldiers killed when enemy forces attacked their vehicle with a roadside bomb in Kandahar province, Afghanistan, on October 15, 2009

-Pfc. Brandon M. Styer, 19 – Lancaster, Pennsylvania – 569th Mobility Augmentation Company, 4th Engineer Battalion. One of four soldiers killed when enemy forces attacked their vehicle with a roadside bomb in Kandahar province, Afghanistan, on October 15, 2009

September 14, 2009

-Sgt. Andrew H. McConnell, 24 – Carlisle, Pennsylvania – 2nd Battalion, 1st Infantry Regiment, 5th Stryker Brigade Combat Team, 2nd Infantry Division. One of two soldiers killed when enemy forces attacked their vehicle with a roadside bomb in southern Afghanistan on September 14, 2009

July 23, 2009

-Sgt. Ryan H. Lane, 25 – Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania – 2nd Light Armored Reconnaissance Battalion, 2nd Marine Division, II Marine Expeditionary Force. Died of wounds suffered while supporting combat operations in Helmand province, Afghanistan, on July 23, 2009.

July 23, 2009

-Sgt. Joshua J. Rimer, 24 – Rochester, Pennsylvania – 4th Engineer Battalion, 555th Engineer Brigade. One of two soldiers killed when a roadside bomb detonated near their vehicle in Zabul province, Afghanistan, on July 22, 2009

July 13, 2009

-Sgt. Michael W. Heede Jr., 22 – Delta, Pennsylvania – 1st Combat Engineer Battalion, 1st Marine Division, I Marine Expeditionary Force, One of two Marines killed while supporting combat operations in Helmand province, Afghanistan, on July 13, 2009

May 1, 2009

-Staff Sgt. William D. Vile, 27 – Philadelphia, Pennsylvania – 1st Brigade, 1st Infantry Division. One of three soldiers killed when insurgents attacked their unit using direct fire near the village of Nishagam, in Kunar province, Afghanistan, on May 1, 2009.

March 22, 2009

-Cpl. Anthony L. Williams, 21 – Oxford, Pennsylvania – 3rd Battalion, 8th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, II Marine Expeditionary Force. One of two Marines killed while supporting combat operations in Helmand province, Afghanistan, on March 22, 2009.

February 12, 2009

-Staff Sgt. Marc J. Small, 29 – Collegeville, Pennsylvania – 1st Battalion, 3rd Special Forces Group. Died of wounds suffered when insurgents attacked his unit using a rocket-propelled grenade launcher and small-arms fire in Faramuz, Afghanistan, on February 12, 2009

January 27, 2009

-Sgt. David W. Wallace III, 25 – Sharpsville, Pennsylvania – 2nd Combat Engineer Battalion, 2nd Marine Division, II Marine Expeditionary Force. Killed while supporting combat operations in Helmand province, Afghanistan, on January 27, 2009

September 11, 2008

-Chief Warrant Officer Michael Slebodnik, 39 -Gibsonia, Pennsylvania – 2nd Battalion, 17th Cavalry Regiment, 101st Combat Aviation Brigade, 101st Airborne Division. Died of wounds suffered when the aircraft he was piloting received enemy fire near Forward Operating Base Nagil, Afghanistan, on September 11, 2008

September 6, 2008

- Pvt. Michael R. Dinterman, 18 – Littlestown, Pennsylvania – 1st Battalion, 26th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 1st Infantry Division, Died of wounds suffered when he received enemy fire while on dismounted patrol at Oustpost Restrepo, Kunar Province, Afghanistan, on September 6, 2008

August 17, 2008

Spc. Jonathon Luscher, 20 – Scranton, Pennsylvania – 1st Battalion, 109th Infantry, Pennsylvania Army National Guard. Died of injuries sustained in a non-combat related incident at Forward Operating Base Mehtar Lam, Afghanistan, on August 17, 2008

August 1, 2008

2nd Lt. Michael R. Girdano, 23 – Apollo, Pennsylvania – Company A, Special Troops Battalion, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 1st Infantry Division, One of four soldiers killed when their vehicle encountered a roadside bomb in Chowkay Valley, Afghanistan, on August 1, 2008.

July 8, 2008

- Sgt. Douglas J. Bull, 29 – Wilkes Barre, Pennsylvania – Special Troops Battalion, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 1st Infantry Division, Killed when his vehicle encountered a roadside bomb during a mounted patrol in Chow Kay Valley, Afghanistan, on July 8, 2008.

June 3, 2008

-Pfc. Derek D. Holland, 20 – Wind Gap, Pennsylvania – Company A, 228th Brigade Support Battalion, Pennsylvania Army National Guard, One of two soldiers killed when their vehicle struck a roadside bomb in Zormat, Afghanistan, on June 3, 2008.

May 20, 2008

1st Lt. Jeffrey F. Deprimo, 35 – Pittston, Pennsyvlania – 3rd Battalion, 103rd Armor Regiment, Pennsylvania Army National Guard, Died of wounds suffered when his vehicle encountered a roadside bomb in Ghazni, Afghanistan, on May 20, 2008.

May 11, 2008

- Pvt. Matthew W. Brown, 20 – Zelienople, Pennsylvania – 3rd Battalion, 321st Field Artillery Regiment, 18th Fires Brigade, Died from injuries suffered in a non-combat related incident in Asadabad, Afghanistan, on May 11, 2008.

November 12, 2007

Capt. David A. Boris, 30 – Pennsylvania – 1st Squadron, 91st Cavalry Regiment, 173rd Airborne Brigade Combat Team, One of two soldiers killed when the vehicle they were in was struck by a roadside bomb in Bermel, Afghanistan on November 12, 2007.

November 10, 2007

Staff Sgt. Patrick F. Kutschbach, 25 – Rocks, Pennsylvania -1st Battalion, 10th Special Forces Group McKees, died of wounds suffered when his vehicle was struck by a rocket-propelled grenade and small-arms fire in Bagram, Afghanistan, on November 10, 2007.

August 27, 2007

- Sgt. Jan M. Argonish, 26 – Peckville, Pennsylvania – 55th Brigade, Pennsylvania Army National Guard, One of three soldiers killed when insurgents attacked their unit during combat operations in Jalalabad, Afghanistan, on August 27, 2007.

- Master Sgt. Scott R. Ball, 38 – Mount Holly Springs, Pennsylvania – 55th Brigade, Pennsylvania Army National Guard, One of three soldiers killed when insurgents attacked their unit during combat operations in Jalalabad, Afghanistan, on August 27, 2007.

June 15, 2007

-Master Sgt. Arthur L. Lilley, 35 – Smithfield, Pennsylvania – Company B, 2nd Battalion, 7th Special Forces Group. Died of wounds sustained from enemy small-arms fire during combat operations in Paktika province, near Shkin, Afghanistan, on June 15, 2007.

October 31, 2006

Sgt. Charles T. McClain, 26 – Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania – Company A, 3rd Brigade Special Troops Battalion, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 10th Mountain Division. Died in Asadabad, Afghanistan, of injuries sustained when a roadside bomb exploded near his vehicle in Wygal Valley, Afghanistan, on October 31, 2006. Two other soldiers also were killed.

July 21, 2006

-1st Sgt. Christopher C. Rafferty, 37 – Brownsville, Pennsylvania – Company C, 37th Engineer Battalion. Died on July 21, 2006 as a result of shrapnel wounds suffered on July 20 while he was coordinating a response to a mortar and possible rocket-propelled grenade attack in Sharana, Afghanistan.

June 24, 2006

Master Sgt. Thomas D. Maholic, 38 – Bradford, Pennsylvania – 2nd Battalion, 7th Special Forces Group. Killed when he was fatally struck by enemy small-arms fire during a cordon and search mission near Ghecko, Afghanistan, on June 24, 2006.

February 17, 2006

Sgt. James F. Fordyce, 22 – Newton Square, Pennsylvania – Heavy Helicopter Squadron 464, Marine Air Group 29, 2nd Marine Aircraft Wing, II Marine Expeditionary Force, One of eight Marines and two airmen killed when two CH-53E Super Stallion helicopters crashed into the Gulf of Aden near Ras Siyyan in northern Djibouti, while flying a training mission in the Godoria Range area on February 17, 2006.

-Sgt. Jonathan E. McColley, 23 – Gettysburg, Pennsylvania – Heavy Helicopter Squadron 464, Marine Air Group 29, 2nd Marine Aircraft Wing, I Marine Expeditionary Force. One of eight Marines and two airmen killed when two CH-53E Super Stallion helicopters crashed into the Gulf of Aden near Ras Siyyan in northern Djibouti, while flying a training mission in the Godoria Range area on February 17, 2006.

-Capt. Bryan D. Willard, 33 – Hummelstown, Pennsylvania – Heavy Helicopter Squadron 464, Marine Air Group 29, 2nd Marine Aircraft Wing, II Marine Expeditionary Force. One of eight Marines and two airmen killed when two CH-53E Super Stallion helicopters crashed into the Gulf of Aden near Ras Siyyan in northern Djibouti, while flying a training mission in the Godoria Range area on February 17, 2006.

October 9, 2005

Staff Sgt. Troy S. Ezernack, 39 – Lancaster, Pennsylvania – Company A, 2nd Battalion, 503rd Infantry Regiment, 173rd Airborne Brigade, Died of injuries sustained when his combat patrol was attacked by enemy forces using a grenade in Qalat, Afghanistan, on October 9, 2005.

March 26, 2005

Spc. Brett M. Hershey, 23 – State College, Pennsylvania – Headquarters Company, 76th Infantry Brigade, Indiana Army National Guard, One of four soldiers killed when a land mine exploded beneath their vehicle while they were examining potential firing range sites for the Afghan military in Kabul, Afghanistan, on March 26, 2005.

October 30, 2003

-Staff Sgt. Paul A. Sweeney, 32 – Lakeville, Pennsylvania – Company A, 3rd Battalion, 3rd Special Forces Group. Killed when his unit was ambushed while on patrol north of Musa, Qalax in Afghanistan, on October 30, 2003.

July 9, 2003

Sgt. Christopher P. Geiger, 38 – Northhampton, Pennsylvania – Headquarters Company, 213th Area Support Group, Pennsylvania Army National Guard, Died of a non-combat related cause in Bagram, Afghanistan, on July 9, 2003.

March 13, 2003

- Pfc. James R. Dillon Jr., 19 – Grove City, Pennsylvania – 3rd Light Armored Reconnaissance Battalion, 1st Marine Division, Died of a non-combat related injury in Kuwait on March 13, 2003.

 

Milton Street

Stormy Seas

As we enter into the election cycle for 2012 there are things no one can control…..or can they?